Author Corner–Interview with Steven Donahue

Today is a special day at Erindipity.  I am graduating this evening with distinction after a 4.0 semester.  As it happens, today is the day that Steven Donahue popped in for a chat.

Grey shirt 2013

And what, sweet mother of Zeus, does he have with him?!

E: Steven, welcome to Erindipity.  I see you brought me a pie.  I think I’m going to like you.

S: Erin, thank you for inviting me to your page. I hope you like apple pie.

This is an apple pie. There are many like it, but this one is mine. And if you try to eat any, I will cut you. No really, I'll cut you.

This is an apple pie. There are many like it, but this one is mine. And if you try to eat any, I will cut you. No really, I’ll cut you.

 

E: I do, indeed.  You just had a new book come out.  What can you tell us about it?

S: My newest release is Amy the Astronaut and the Flight for Freedom (Hydra Publications). It is a young-adult science-fiction novel. It tells the story of twelve-year-old Amy Sutter, a girl who steals an experimental spacecraft named Liberty Bell to rescue her father and his colleagues from alien captors called the Crownaxians. She is pursued by Lt. Yale Brown, the officer who was in charge of the ship’s security, who has orders to bring back the Liberty Bell at any cost.

Print

E: Are you working on anything new at the moment?

S: I have another book slated to come out later in 2013. The book is titled The Manila Strangler (Rainstorm Press), and it is about a private investigator and a Philadelphia homicide detective who try to catch a serial strangler in the City of Brotherly Love.  

E: How old were you when you first started writing and what made you start?

S: I started writing in grade school after reading books by author Matt Christopher. His sports books inspired me to be a writer.

E: Who has influenced your writing?

S: Matt Christopher (as mentioned above), John Jakes and Ernest Hemmingway.

E: What is your process: plot it out or fly by the seat of your pants and hope for the best?

S: I plot it out. I write an outline for the entire book to use as a guide and then I add things as they come to me while writing the manuscript.

E: It seems like most of us have day jobs.  Do you have one, too?

S: Yes, I work as a communicator for a healthcare company in Pennsylvania. 

E: What was the best piece of writing advice anyone ever gave you?

S: I don’t remember who said it, but sit yourself down for at least one hour or until you write one good page every day is the best advice I’ve ever been given. 

Thanks a lot for stopping by, Steven.  Now, if you folks will excuse me, I’ve got a pie to eat before graduation.