Geoffrey Chaucer and Charmi Keranen

A few days ago, I posted a poem from Charmi Keranen from her book The Afterlife is a Dry County.  Today I get to talk with her and pick her brain a bit.  I love getting to meet and talk with other writers.  Everyone’s writing process is different, and I’ve gotten some interesting ideas from other writers based on how they do things.  I especially like to ask them who they are reading.  If you’re a writer, but you don’t read anything beyond the shampoo bottle while you’re sitting on the porcelain throne, you’re doing it wrong.  Even reading <shudder> Twilight is better than reading nothing at all.  I just hope if you do read Twilight, you read it as an instruction on how not to write.  I don’t get to meet Cynthia Cruz, though.  This makes me very sad.

In other news, I’ve been memorizing the first 18 lines of the Prologue to the Canterbury Tales.  In Middle English.  Unfortunately, this has nothing to do with Middle Earth.  This, too, makes me very sad.  I’ve read the Knight’s Tale and the Miller’s Tale so far.  I’m looking forward to the Wife of Bath’s Tale.  That’s one of my favorites.

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6 comments on “Geoffrey Chaucer and Charmi Keranen

  1. It was quite fun coming to your class! Don’t worry if you don’t “get” my work. I think the same thing about so many poets (or life in general, for that matter)!

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    • erinrbritt says:

      Actually, your coming to class was really enlightening. I got a lot more out of it after having the chance to talk with you. Thanks for coming in! Too bad I couldn’t find a dignified way to sneak in an autograph.

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  2. David is right. It often helps to hear the person read. That’s funny about the autograph thing. I haven’t quite gotten used to either giving autographs or asking for them from others!

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    • erinrbritt says:

      I’ve gone to a couple of book signings on campus, but I’ve never accosted anyone for their autograph. I’ve signed a couple of copies of Celia for people and it feels really, really weird.

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  3. Fun! I just put your book on my to-read list.

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